ManagerKnowHow

Helps you develop new skills

Courses

Choose from a variety of learning modalities including in-person classroom, virtual classrooms, or self-paced eLearning.

Experiential Learning

Courses and workshops are designed to engage, challenge, and build critical leadership competencies.
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Toolkits

Our comprehensive toolkits deliver everything you need to help define and strategize the solutions that work best for you.

On Demand

Download and implement! Resources you can use with your team to help you get on the same page so you’re more effective and productive. All handouts, presentations, resources, and instructions are included.
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Assessments

Building self-awareness is a critical skill for leadersand managers. Assessments enable leaders to gain clarity about themselves.

Valid and Reliable

We offer a reliable and evidence-based range of assessments including the Myers Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI), the EQ-i and the EQ360
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Coaching/Mentoring

Leadership is not just about formal learning, enhance your skills and development through coaching or mentoring.

Coaching and Mentoring

From one-to-one executive coaching to group-based, topic-specific mentoring, we design and deliver relationship-based development solutions for your organization.
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MKH Leadership Competency Model

Our Programs are directly linked with the MKH Leadership Competency Model. We offer courses for all sections of the model except Organizational Awareness and Industry Knowledge.

<strong>Communicating Effectively</strong><br> Interpersonal communication skills are the cornerstone of any manager or leaders’ skillset. Often, the difference between a manager being effective or ineffective depends on the ability to communicate. When we discuss communication skills it’s easy to think that we are talking about the words spoken in workplace interactions, but research tells us that effective communication also involves paying attention to how things are said, including tone and body language. Understanding self and others through assessments such as the Myers Briggs Type Inventory ensures leaders communicate in ways that resonate with team members at all levels. <strong>Coaching for Results</strong><br>There is so much contrasting information about coaching, and coaching approaches, that it is hard to differentiate between what an executive coach might do from what a manager might do. The truth is that both disciplines can learn from each other. Managers and leaders can often achieve better results with a more coaching based approach. Using coaching skills does not mean that, as a manager or leader, you will be having coaching sessions with the members of your team. Instead it’s about using coaching skills, and coaching approaches, to do what skilled executive coaches do – help people find within themselves the strengths and solutions they need to take their performance to a new level. <strong>Managing Conflict</strong><br>Have you ever wondered how a workplace conflict can become such a big deal? How did the situation go astray? At ManagerKnowHow we see conflict as a struggle or dispute between two or more individuals or groups arising from a difference of opinion, competing demands, opposition of interests, or another controversy. Most managers have seen individuals or groups experience conflict and then watch as it leads to discord, and emotional\psychological tension. Conflict management skills are important for managers and leaders in any industry. <strong>Developing High Performance Teams</strong><br> Have you ever been a part of a high performing team? There is nothing more satisfying than working beside your teammates to successfully achieve a challenging or difficult goal (athletic and business teams alike). Developing high performance teams may be one of the most important responsibilities of a manager or leader; and clearly, if it were easy, then all teams would be highly successful. At ManagerKnowHow, we believe a team is much more than just a collection of people working towards the same specific goal or objectives. High performance teams connect with each other, care about their work, and accomplish high quality work linked to the organization’s vision and objectives. <strong>Leading for Accountability</strong><br>What keeps most managers up at night? Usually, it is the performance of their employees…and generally not the good performers. Performance management is the process through which a manager monitors, evaluates, and contributes to the performance of employees. At ManagerKnowHow we see this is an iterative and on-going process that involves goal setting, two-way communication, and regular feedback. In this way, the manager ensures that an employee’s goals, actions, and behaviours remain aligned with the mission, vision, values, and direction of the organization. <strong>Leading for Peak Productivity</strong><br>There never seems to be enough time in the day. Most managers solve their ‘time drought’ by adding more hours to the start or the end of their day or sacrificing personal time with family, friends, and hobbies. Eventually, managers often find themselves in an unproductive and unsustainable situation where their work-life balance has eroded to the point of physical and emotional exhaustion. At ManagerKnowHow.com, we consider time and workload management as a skill that is critical to achieving peak productivity. <strong>Leading Effective Meetings</strong><br>Of all the topics that we have taught over the years, none generate as much interest, or frustration, as that of running effective meetings. We often hear stories of meetings where no one is sure who is leading the process, unclear agendas, downward spiralling conversations, and uncertainty about who is doing what at the end of the meeting. Sound familiar? Before looking in depth at how to run an effective meeting, it’s also important to consider when to run a meeting and for what purpose. Groups that meet too frequently find that they fill meetings with generalized discussion, and team members complain that they find meetings take up too much time in their schedules. Concise direction and skilled management of human dynamics allows leaders to create meetings that are valuable and well attended. <strong>Leading Change</strong><br>A quick browse through popular literature will yield nuggets like “the only constant is change”. Such platitudes are great for bedtime reading, but they don’t help you much as a manager who has been given the responsibility of designing or leading change. What you need are practical skills and tools that can help you to facilitate or lead change within YOUR work environment. Helping others navigate change is a valuable trait for all leaders. Effective managers and leaders know that how they deal with the change will play a large part in how the change is received and treated by affected parties. <strong>Developing Strategy</strong><br>Does your organization or department have a plan? Where are you going? What are you trying to achieve? Why do we do what we do? What is most important? When asked, many employees feel that their organization or department is floating aimlessly without clear well defined direction. High functioning teams, departments, organizations, or programs must have a clear vision, values and goals/objectives in order to be successful and reach their potential. This is best achieved through a proven strategic planning process. <strong>Navigating Organizational Systems</strong><br>Human and organizational systems both are unpredictable, and predictable at the same time. While at first glance this may seem an impossible state, it is important for leaders to be able to discern what actions they might take in order to influence a system, and how to assess (and adjust approach!) the impact. Understanding what is predictable in human and organizational systems gives managers and leaders the skillset to effectively navigate, and potentially change, the systems in which they work and live. At ManagerKnowHow, we consider human and organizational systems acumen to be important to the context of leadership. <strong>Leading Self</strong><br>The idea that Leaders and Managers need to have a high level of self-awareness is a prominent theme in much of related literature and theory. Our experience in the field has proven this time and time again. Understanding self allows leaders to recognize impact they have on others and to make themselves understandable to others. “EQ” measures “Emotional Intelligence” - a set of emotional and social skills that collectively establish how well leaders perceive and express themselves, how adept they are at developing and maintaining relationships, how effectively they cope with challenges and how they use emotional information in an effective and meaningful way including decision making. At ManagerKnowHow we consider EQ and self-awarenessto be a core characteristic of effective leadership, which is why it is the centre of our ManagerKnowHow Model. <strong>Organizational Awareness</strong><br>Depending on their size and specific industry, organizations can be extremely complex and difficult for managers to navigate.  The ability of a manager to negotiate the networks, reporting structures, and multitude of departments will have a dramatic impact on that manager’s ability to complete tasks or move initiatives forward within the organization.  Unfortunately, most orientation programs (if they exist!) for managers do not include an organizational roadmap to assist new managers in determining ‘who does what’ in the system.  Furthermore, organizations are not static - they tend to grow, change and evolve.  As this evolution occurs (or turnover happens), managers are not necessarily made aware of system or departmental changes that impact the way business flow or processes. <strong>Industry Knowledge </strong><br>It may seem somewhat obvious to suggest that knowledge of your specific industry is an important contextual component of your leadership and management.  Not so fast!  There are plenty of managers who would argue that they do not require more than superficial knowledge of their industry in order to be successful.  At MKH, we believe it is important to recognize that industry specific knowledge is an important aspect of any successful manager / leader. <strong>Organizational Awareness</strong><br>Depending on their size and specific industry, organizations can be extremely complex and difficult for managers to navigate.  The ability of a manager to negotiate the networks, reporting structures, and multitude of departments will have a dramatic impact on that manager’s ability to complete tasks or move initiatives forward within the organization.  Unfortunately, most orientation programs (if they exist!) for managers do not include an organizational roadmap to assist new managers in determining ‘who does what’ in the system.  Furthermore, organizations are not static - they tend to grow, change and evolve.  As this evolution occurs (or turnover happens), managers are not necessarily made aware of system or departmental changes that impact the way business flow or processes. <strong>Industry Knowledge</strong> <br>It may seem somewhat obvious to suggest that knowledge of your specific industry is an important contextual component of your leadership and management.  Not so fast!  There are plenty of managers who would argue that they do not require more than superficial knowledge of their industry in order to be successful.  At MKH, we believe it is important to recognize that industry specific knowledge is an important aspect of any successful manager / leader. <strong>Situational Leadership</strong><br>Every leader has their own preferred style of leadership and decision-making.  Past experience, personal preferences, and natural tendencies all contribute to the way a leader approaches a particular challenge or problem in the workplace.  Leadership style essentially describes the ‘way’ in which a leader approaches a particular problem, situation, or solution.  Seasoned successful leaders have a number of different styles, and, depending on the situation, can transition between styles to achieve the best outcome. <strong>Decision Making</strong><br>Every leader has their own preferred style of leadership and decision-making.  Past experience, personal preferences, and natural tendencies all contribute to the way a leader approaches a particular challenge or problem in the workplace.  Leadership style essentially describes the ‘way’ in which a leader approaches a particular problem, situation, or solution.  Seasoned successful leaders have a number of different styles, and, depending on the situation, can transition between styles to achieve the best outcome.

ManagerKnowHow supports leaders through "best in class" skill development!